Goodbye Alcohol: A Breakup Letter Alcohol and You

When I got sober I went to detox, and then to an outpatient program. For over a year I attended an early recovery group meeting once a week along with therapy and a 12-step program. I was asked to write this letter…a goodbye letter to my addiction. This blog is for informational purposes only and should not be a substitute for medical advice. We understand that everyone’s situation is unique, and this content is to provide an overall understanding of substance use disorder. These disorders are very complex, and this post does not take into account the unique circumstances for every individual. For specific questions about your health needs or that of a loved one, seek the help of a healthcare professional. Addiction recovery is a big step; when you stumble, it is tempting to just give up. When you focus on writing about why you decided to get sober, it will reinforce these reasons. You can write about how you knew you hit rock bottom and needed help.

How could you come between my family and me? You couldn’t handle even a few special days off so others could shine. You’re very selfish and only concerned with your own well-being. When I tried to work out and get healthier, you were always waiting for me after the gym, prodding me to just spend a little time with you. Then you seduced me into spending the night with you, and in the morning you’d laugh at me while my head and stomach ached from too much of you. You also helped me through some rough periods in my life too.

Goodbye Letter to Drugs: Why & How to Write One

Writing down your goals can dramatically increase your chances of achieving them. A letter may not be as grand or as effective as talking to a therapist, but it is a valid approach nonetheless. It can fire up your determination to leave drugs and alcohol behind. As much as I’d like to blame you for what’s happened to me, our relationship started out with good intentions and just imploded on itself. They say Sober Home it’s not something that consciously happens, and it really was out of my control. But with help from a lot of caring people, I’m taking control of my life again. As much as it hurts to walk away from you, I’ll always try to remember the good times of my life and put the bad times behind me. Writing a goodbye letter to alcohol is like writing in a journal, no one needs to see it unless you want to share.

She doesn’t judge me, get jealous, or fill my head with empty promises. She has lots of friends that she’s helped before and they’ve turned their lives around. Some took longer than others but they all help each other because they’ve been where I am today. Her name is Recovery and she makes me feel good about myself…as a Person, a Father, a Spouse, and a Friend. I don’t know why I didn’t do it before. Maybe I was embarrassed to admit how much control I’d given you… But I was so desperate, I called someone I knew who was sober. He told me I didn’t have to fight you alone.

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Going into a tough neighborhood filled with dangerous people was always an experience that made me feel invincible. Some days, I thought you were what I wanted. Sometimes the drug abuse made me feel great, eased my inhibitions, and made me forget about my own self-contempt. You used to be all I ever thought about.

  • Professionals who use the tools available on this website should not practice outside of their own areas of competency.
  • I am hoping this will help give me a final sense of closure, and help support other people who are struggling with substance abuse, just as I once did.
  • And to do all of this, I need you out of my life.
  • I really think you just wanted to be my buddy in the beginning.
  • As a former Nurse Practitioner in Miami, she found her passion for addiction treatment when a family member was lost to his disease.

You threatened me with illness, depression, anxiety. I reached a point where I wouldn’t go anywhere without you. The other people I was with were bothered by that, and they began to avoid me because they didn’t like you — and they no longer liked the “me” I had become. In addition to working for Cumberland Heights, Dr. Sledge is an assistant professor at the University of Tennessee College of Medicine. Randal received master’s degrees in counseling goodbye alcohol letter from Trevecca Nazarene University and in psychology from Pacifica Graduate Institute. He is a frequent presenter on a variety of topics such as assessment, sexual behavior in children, ethics, dreamwork and trauma. He is a certified practitioner of DreamTending and a qualified clinical supervisor. Her core belief is that love is more powerful than the wounds we have experienced, and, in fact, can cause us to become our strongest at those places.

Not only will it help you put the past behind you, but it will also help you focus on the future. For many, cutting ties with an addiction is similar to breaking up a long-term relationship. Going through detox and addiction treatment is effective, but it’s common to enter sobriety feeling like there are unresolved issues. At Resurgence Behavioral Health, we ask you to bring a journal or notebook to record your journey to sobriety. In your goodbye letter to drugs, describing the effects abuse has had on your life can motivate change. Having problems with the law, strained personal relationships, damaged reputation, and damaged self-esteem are some effects we don’t want to acknowledge.

How much more do I have to lose before I’m willing to leave you for good? No, I am making the decision to leave you now. I am deciding that I have had enough of you. I was too scared to leave you before.

Ending your addiction relationship isn’t easy, but it will be the finest decision you’ve ever made. You assured me that everything would be OK if I surrendered control of my life to you. I think saying goodbye to you will be the most difficult thing I’ll ever have to do. You’ve been here for a long time, and I assumed you’d never go. Positivity can assist you in overcoming self-defeating and negative thoughts. Try statements like “you have the power to change” and “you are more than an addict.” Remind yourself about the good things you deserve. We typically only cite Government studies, peer-reviewed medical/clinical/academic papers, and quotes from clinical/medical experts. Worst of all, you have a serious jealousy streak in you, bordering on psychotic.
goodbye alcohol letter

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